Tag Archives: Hill

More #West #Coast #Scotland #Argyll #Photo www.henni.photo .@LynnHenni

Another post from the West Coast.

Post by Lynn and Paul Henni

On our long walk around Dunadd en route to the Crinan Canal, Paul couldn’t resist the view from this bridge crossing the River Add; whereas I prefered the bridge itself featuring my muse.

Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.

Shortly after the bridge, we happened on some sheep – mostly grazing on the hay bale but one seemed determined to see us off.

Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.

No paseran!

Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

They stopped eating, showed some mild interest in us in the way that sheep do, then drifted off.

Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

On the following day we walked from Crinan Harbour up the hill on the other side from the Crinan Basin.  The weather was changeable with a lowering sky over the harbour.

Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.

As we climbed, blue skies emerged reflecting turquoise on the water.

Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.

In the distance,  across Loch Crinan we could see Duntrune Castle .  One of Scotland’s many ghosts apparently haunts the castle in the form of a piper killed by defenders in 1615 after playing his bagpipes to warn attackers of the castle that they had been discovered.

Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

As we continued our walk, yet more changes in the weather – here with sunlight reflecting in the middleground while more typical west of Scotland weather lurks in the background.

Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

Taking this photo, Paul was definitely influenced by fellow Norwegian, artist Theodore Kittelsen, you can almost see trolls hiding among the trees.

Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

On our way back from our walk, we stopped at the Crinan Basin for coffee and meringue where we saw the puffer, VIC 32, built in 1943 and reminiscent of the famous Vital Spark.  Clyde Puffers developed from coracles with subsequent influences  from Viking longships and, later, gabbart barges before becoming steam-powered and finally incorporating a wheelhouse.

During the war when there was an urgent need for sea-going victualling or food supply ships,  the Clyde Puffer design provided the ideal  craft.  However, the Clyde ship yards were somewhat busy at this time and the Admiralty had to look elsewhere to fulfil orders so the VIC 32 was one of the puffers built by Dunston’s of Thorne, Yorkshire.

Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.

The VIC 32 is one of the last few coal-fired steam-powered puffers left and it is still possible to cruise round the Scottish islands on her – trips can be booked via website http://savethepuffer.co.uk/

Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

On our way home from Tarbert, driving from Portavadie to Dunoon, we stopped at one of the laybys to check out the view down Loch Riddon towards Stuck, Glaic, Knockdow and Toward.  Scottish placenames are wonderful!

Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.

Getting a bit closer, you can see the Colintraive to Rhubodach ferry in this shot.  Before the ferry was built, cattle were swum across from the island to be sold in lowland markets.

Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

After that, it was off to the ferry and the drive home to Edinburgh.

Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

History, Prehistory and Precipitation #Scotland #Photo www.henni.photo .@LynnHenni

History, Prehistory and Precipitation

Post by Lynn and Paul Henni

Easter weekend in Tarbert was a wild affair weather-wise with rain followed by mist followed by sun with a stunning rainbow appearing in the middle of it all.

Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

 

Tarbert, the Gaelic for an isthmus or a place over which a boat can be dragged (there are a few places with similar names in the west of Scotland) is a lovely wee harbour setting popular with sailors, especially during the Scottish Series Yacht Race which takes place around the end of May each year.  It’s also well known for its annual seafood festival; Tarbert prawns and locally caught scallops feature on most menus in town.

Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.

There is also a lot of history in the area – nearby is Dunadd Hill Fort.  The site first occupied in the Iron Age, was later used by Gaelic kings of Dál Riata  in the 6th to 9th century.  The Dál Riata tribes subsequently merged with the Picts leading to the establishing of the kingdom of Alba.  The site is open to visitors and has some interesting carvings including a boar and 2 human footprints thought to be used in ceremonies to inaugurate new kings. The setting is dramatic, with the hill rising above the Mòine Mhòr, Gaelic for the Great Moss, a huge flat area of marshy land around the Crinan Canal.

Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

The Kilmartin Glen has the highest concentration of prehistoric monuments and historical sites in Scotland.  On our wet walk to Dunadd, we found a couple of impressive standing stones in an otherwise unremarkable field.

Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

The canal is also a favourite with yachtsfolk who want to cross from one side of the peninsula to the other – it provides a short cut from  the Sound of Jura at Crinan to Ardrishaig on Loch Gilp.  Having battled the rain and wind, we were lucky enough to spot this rainbow hovering over the yachts moored on at the Bellanoch Marina on the Canal.

Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

 

Swan Rescue #SSPCA #Blackford #Pond #Cygnet #Edinburgh .@ScottishSPCA www.henni.photo

Post by Paul Henni

Another lunchtime stroll around the Blackford Pond and came across these women from the SSPCA rescuing a young male adult swan who hadn’t ‘flown the nest’ and, sadly, was being harassed by his parent to do so. This had left him in a poor state, so he was being rescued for re-location to the SSPCA Centre in Alloa for feeding up and future release.

Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

#Rare #Nacreous #Cloud #Edinburgh #Weather #Sky www.henni.photo .@LynnHenni

Post by Paul and Lynn Henni

We managed to see some more rare (if that’s not an oxymoron) Nacreous Clouds at sunrise today, over the Edinburgh skyline, with Calton Hill, Arthur’s Seat and the church tower of Broughton St Marys visible. Again, the colours were constantly changing and looked weird.

Nacreous Cloud Over Edinburgh, Scotland. Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Nacreous Cloud Over Edinburgh, Scotland. Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Nacreous Cloud Over Edinburgh, Scotland. Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Nacreous Cloud Over Edinburgh, Scotland. Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Nacreous Cloud Over Edinburgh, Scotland. Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Nacreous Cloud Over Edinburgh, Scotland. Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Nacreous Cloud Over Edinburgh, Scotland. Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Nacreous Cloud Over Edinburgh, Scotland. Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Nacreous Cloud Over Edinburgh, Scotland. Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Nacreous Cloud Over Edinburgh, Scotland. Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Nacreous Cloud Over Edinburgh, Scotland. Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Nacreous Cloud Over Edinburgh, Scotland. Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

‪#Rare #‎Nacreous‬ ‪#‎Cloud‬ ‪#‎Edinburgh‬ #Scotland

 

 

The #Victorian #Dean #Cemetery #Edinburgh #Blackandwhite #Photo www.henni.photo

Post by Lynn and Paul Henni.

The Victorian Dean Cemetery is still in use and is a favourite tranquil shortcut to the Dean Gallery.  It is one of the first cemeteries in Edinburgh to be laid out in formal lines – it is also pretty photogenic.

Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Standing Tall. Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.

This statue caught my eye from over the wall in the grounds of the Dean Gallery – she rose up from the trees dwarfing the smaller tombstones around.

Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Getting The Close Up. Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.

Paul caught in the act snapping this fine fella below, the Reverent Francis Gillies, buried in 1862 and lying alongside 2 daughters, 2 sons, 2 wives and a son-in-law.

The Victorian. Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
The Victorian. Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

In the next shot, my eye was drawn to the angles and contrasts of light and dark – there’s a poignancy to the small cross sitting neatly between the taller ones.

Sunlit. Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Sunlit. Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.

Paul was attracted by this sculpture of unknown deceased which stands proud unlike many of the more 2 dimensional relief memorials.

The Face. Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
The Face. Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

 

 

 

 

We would recommend anyone wandering around that part of Edinburgh with an interest in local history stops for a nosey – many famous Edinburgers lie in rest here – Elsie Inglis, innovative doctor and suffragist; David Octavious Hill, painter and arts activist, and, with Robert Adamson, a pioneer many aspects of photography in Scotland.; and William Henry Playfair, one of the greatest 19th century Scottish architects whose influence is seen all over Edinburgh’s New Town (often to be seen in henni.photo work).