Tag Archives: Ferry

More #West #Coast #Scotland #Argyll #Photo www.henni.photo .@LynnHenni

Another post from the West Coast.

Post by Lynn and Paul Henni

On our long walk around Dunadd en route to the Crinan Canal, Paul couldn’t resist the view from this bridge crossing the River Add; whereas I prefered the bridge itself featuring my muse.

Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.

Shortly after the bridge, we happened on some sheep – mostly grazing on the hay bale but one seemed determined to see us off.

Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.

No paseran!

Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

They stopped eating, showed some mild interest in us in the way that sheep do, then drifted off.

Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

On the following day we walked from Crinan Harbour up the hill on the other side from the Crinan Basin.  The weather was changeable with a lowering sky over the harbour.

Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.

As we climbed, blue skies emerged reflecting turquoise on the water.

Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.

In the distance,  across Loch Crinan we could see Duntrune Castle .  One of Scotland’s many ghosts apparently haunts the castle in the form of a piper killed by defenders in 1615 after playing his bagpipes to warn attackers of the castle that they had been discovered.

Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

As we continued our walk, yet more changes in the weather – here with sunlight reflecting in the middleground while more typical west of Scotland weather lurks in the background.

Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

Taking this photo, Paul was definitely influenced by fellow Norwegian, artist Theodore Kittelsen, you can almost see trolls hiding among the trees.

Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

On our way back from our walk, we stopped at the Crinan Basin for coffee and meringue where we saw the puffer, VIC 32, built in 1943 and reminiscent of the famous Vital Spark.  Clyde Puffers developed from coracles with subsequent influences  from Viking longships and, later, gabbart barges before becoming steam-powered and finally incorporating a wheelhouse.

During the war when there was an urgent need for sea-going victualling or food supply ships,  the Clyde Puffer design provided the ideal  craft.  However, the Clyde ship yards were somewhat busy at this time and the Admiralty had to look elsewhere to fulfil orders so the VIC 32 was one of the puffers built by Dunston’s of Thorne, Yorkshire.

Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.

The VIC 32 is one of the last few coal-fired steam-powered puffers left and it is still possible to cruise round the Scottish islands on her – trips can be booked via website http://savethepuffer.co.uk/

Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

On our way home from Tarbert, driving from Portavadie to Dunoon, we stopped at one of the laybys to check out the view down Loch Riddon towards Stuck, Glaic, Knockdow and Toward.  Scottish placenames are wonderful!

Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.

Getting a bit closer, you can see the Colintraive to Rhubodach ferry in this shot.  Before the ferry was built, cattle were swum across from the island to be sold in lowland markets.

Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

After that, it was off to the ferry and the drive home to Edinburgh.

Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

The Bridge. #Forth #Bridge #Edinburgh #Photo www.henni.photo .@LynnHenni

The Bridge.

Post by Lynn and Paul Henni

So finally, the Hennis arrived at that photographers’ paradise, South Queensferry named for the ferry established in the 11th Century by Queen Margaret (or Saint Margaret of Scotland) to enable pilgrims to cross the Firth of Forth to reach Dunfermline Abbey.   The ferry crossing was used for 11 centuries until replaced by Forth Road Bridge in 1964.

South Queensferry. Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
South Queensferry. Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

The iconic cantilever Forth Bridge was opened in 1890, some 8 years after construction started, employing 4,600 workers at its peak.  Sadly, at least 57 people were recorded in 1890 as dying in the making of the bridge but subsequent research suggest at least 73 deaths.

The rail bridge is over 8,000 feet (nearly 2,500 metres) long and is the second longest cantilever bridge span in the world – only the Quebec Bridge completed in 1917 is longer.

The Bridge. Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
The Bridge. Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.

One of us (that will be adrenalin junkie Lynn), is looking forward to the new visitor centre being built which will include a viewing platform due to open at the north tower in 2017 accessed by ‘panoramic’ lifts.  She can’t wait although she’d probably prefer to be at the top of the Forth Road Bridge so she could shoot the rail bridge.

The Bridge. Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
The Bridge. Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.

We picked a beautiful sunny and windless day to visit so the calm sea provided some striking reflections.  This bay is east of South Queensferry and we could have continued walking to Cramond – next time perhaps.

Rising Tide. Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Rising Tide. Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

Paul is fascinated by Inchmickery, a tiny island which was used as a gun emplacement in both World Wars.  The concrete buildings were designed to make the island look like a battleship from a distance which this photo demonstrates.  Although deserted by humans, it is now an RSPB reserve housing common eider, Sandwich terns and a range of gulls.

Inchmickery. Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Inchmickery. Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.