The Bridge. #Forth #Bridge #Edinburgh #Photo www.henni.photo .@LynnHenni

The Bridge.

Post by Lynn and Paul Henni

So finally, the Hennis arrived at that photographers’ paradise, South Queensferry named for the ferry established in the 11th Century by Queen Margaret (or Saint Margaret of Scotland) to enable pilgrims to cross the Firth of Forth to reach Dunfermline Abbey.   The ferry crossing was used for 11 centuries until replaced by Forth Road Bridge in 1964.

South Queensferry. Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
South Queensferry. Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

The iconic cantilever Forth Bridge was opened in 1890, some 8 years after construction started, employing 4,600 workers at its peak.  Sadly, at least 57 people were recorded in 1890 as dying in the making of the bridge but subsequent research suggest at least 73 deaths.

The rail bridge is over 8,000 feet (nearly 2,500 metres) long and is the second longest cantilever bridge span in the world – only the Quebec Bridge completed in 1917 is longer.

The Bridge. Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
The Bridge. Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.

One of us (that will be adrenalin junkie Lynn), is looking forward to the new visitor centre being built which will include a viewing platform due to open at the north tower in 2017 accessed by ‘panoramic’ lifts.  She can’t wait although she’d probably prefer to be at the top of the Forth Road Bridge so she could shoot the rail bridge.

The Bridge. Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.
The Bridge. Photo by and copyright of Lynn Henni.

We picked a beautiful sunny and windless day to visit so the calm sea provided some striking reflections.  This bay is east of South Queensferry and we could have continued walking to Cramond – next time perhaps.

Rising Tide. Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Rising Tide. Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

Paul is fascinated by Inchmickery, a tiny island which was used as a gun emplacement in both World Wars.  The concrete buildings were designed to make the island look like a battleship from a distance which this photo demonstrates.  Although deserted by humans, it is now an RSPB reserve housing common eider, Sandwich terns and a range of gulls.

Inchmickery. Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.
Inchmickery. Photo by and copyright of Paul Henni.

 

Author: knicksen

henni.photo brings together Lynn Henni who has studied photography and film-making and Paul Henni who has a background as a freelance designer and sculptor. Their interest in urban imagery combined with a lifetime of living in and exploring their home city of Edinburgh brings a unique perspective to this beautiful and multi-faceted place. Sometimes gritty, often unexpected, their images present an insider’s perspective on the city.

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